Thursday, August 17, 2017

Another couple items checked off.

For starters, I had another casualty today.  Probably caused by me playing frisbee during lunch.  That being said, I double heat shrink wrapped it, and it is holding pretty well.  Time to get new glasses I guess.


I worked most of the way to sunset (I once again didn't get out when I wanted to), but then had to put the tarp back up, which is a real pain to do by oneself.  I did however, get all the hurricane ties installed, and all the ceiling beams are fastened, the two items I wanted to complete today.


It was a major pain, but I did get the tarp back up.  Took almost an hour, especially in the dark.


I also cleaned out the spare stuff out of my car, I am preparing for a trip to KY to watch the eclipse, so there won't be any posts for a few days.


Here is the final updated checklist before I take off.
  1. Square up the corners
  2. Attach ceiling beams
  3. Secure rafters and beams with hurricane ties
  4. Attach the subflooring to the trailer frame.
  5. Sheathe the roof
  6. *Install tar paper to make the roof watertight.  *5
  7. Install window framing.
  8. *Tyvek wrap.  *7
  9. *Install roof.  *6
  10. *Install siding.  This includes all flashing.  *8
  11. *Install attic vent and AAV (AAV = air access valve for the plumbing). *10
  12. Run the rough plumbing. (includes gas line for stove)
  13. Run the rough electric.
  14. *Install rodent barrier.  *4
  15. *Install insulation.  *10
  16. *Install flooring.  *15
  17. *Install ceiling and attic insulation. *13
  18. *Install light fixtures.  *17
  19. *Install paneling  *13, 15
  20. *Complete electrical and plumbing.  *19
  21. *Install final flooring (carpet/linoleum).  *16, 19
  22. Install interior fixtures.  When I get here, I will likely create a new list for the interior work.

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Quick update; other side done.

I finished the other side today, so all the rafters that are hung (there are two still MIA) are now attached to the top plates.  I got out of work later than desired, so it took me all the way to sunset.


I had to prop up the ridge to get things lined up better.  I will probably build a support for it once I get a little further along.


One slightly disappointing thing is that even despite the braces and the whole roof now being attached, the walls still went back to being slightly tilted when I released the straps and everything.  at this point, there isn't much I can do about it, and it isn't bad, but it is still disappointing.  They are better than before, but still not square.  I might try straightening it back up and using longer braces so that the natural flex in the wood is less significant.  The siding is the last piece that will help hold it square, so I will need to look at it before then.

Not much movement on the to do list, but I am planning on leaving work a little early tomorrow and will try to get at least two and three done, maybe four if all goes well.  I picked up a spool of wire and the tar paper, so I have those at the ready just in case, though with everything so far taking longer than expected, I doubt I get that far.  Since the rain on Friday night has moved up to Friday morning, I can't wait until Friday to tarp it.
  1. Square up the corners
  2. Attach ceiling beams
  3. Secure rafters and beams with hurricane ties
  4. Attach the subflooring to the trailer frame.
  5. *Sheathe the roof  *2
  6. *Install tar paper to make the roof watertight.  *5
  7. Install window framing.
  8. *Tyvek wrap.  *7
  9. *Install roof.  *6
  10. *Install siding.  This includes all flashing.  *8
  11. *Install attic vent and AAV (AAV = air access valve for the plumbing). *10
  12. Run the rough plumbing. (includes gas line for stove)
  13. Run the rough electric.
  14. *Install rodent barrier.  *4
  15. *Install insulation.  *10
  16. *Install flooring.  *15
  17. *Install ceiling and attic insulation. *13, 3
  18. *Install light fixtures.  *17
  19. *Install paneling  *13, 15
  20. *Complete electrical and plumbing.  *19
  21. *Install final flooring (carpet/linoleum).  *16, 19
  22. Install interior fixtures.  When I get here, I will likely create a new list for the interior work.

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Windows picked up and finally square.

The frame got wet, very wet last night.  It stormed heavily and the rain was pretty constant all night.  So much for that 10% chance of showers.  It was decent this afternoon though, and I worked through sunset.

I started the work today by picking up the windows.  None of them rattle, so I hope they are all intact.


They take up a lot of space.  My shed is now filling up with things to be installed.  You got the windows on the left, the door, the fridge and the stove on the right.


The big news for today though is I got the Frame all squared up.  I had to torque it a bit, but everything is now level in each direction.  Because I didn't have any help, I ended up strapping it and ratcheting it straight.


I put corner braces in.  These should be sufficient to hold it square.  I put one in each the X and Y axis.  It was already square in the Z axis.  They will be removed once the roofing is complete, which should be sufficient to hold it square.


I also had a problem with the long walls sagging out.  I fixed that right up too.


While not perfect, I started attaching the rafters.  I got the slab side almost complete (all except the last one on the road side).  All of them are within an eighth inch of flush, with none of them overhanging.  I haven't gotten the hurricane ties on yet, but am putting a screw in the ends and into the top plate.  I used a screw instead of toenailing in framing nails because from my experience when you toenail something in it will shift and is more likely to split.  I will be installing the ties at a later date, but that can be done once the roof is on.


I got a little bit of free time while waiting for things to compile at work, and made a rough updated floorplan sketch with the windows and with the extra length removed.  One thing I don't like is the stove is now right next to my desk, which seems like a bad idea.  I might put the small closet back in and take the extra length off the long closet.  I really ought to take a foot or two out of the desk/TV blocks, but I can't unless I want to downsize the TV or lose a monitor, neither of which are appealing.  I suppose I could try going vertical with the monitors, but I honestly don't know how much I would like that, and if I make the space too small, there is no going back if I don't like it.


I only checked off one item from the list, but most importantly it removes the asterisks from the roofing parts of the to-do list, and leaves only a couple of things before it is weather tight.  I need to finish screwing the rafters in and then it is just installing the sheathing and the tar paper.  I have noticed that I appear to have misplaced (and probably cut up for other framing) the last two rafters that I hadn't installed.  Kind of annoying.

  1. Square up the corners
  2. Attach ceiling beams
  3. Secure rafters and beams with hurricane ties
  4. Attach the subflooring to the trailer frame.
  5. *Sheathe the roof
  6. *Install tar paper to make the roof watertight.
  7. Install window framing.
  8. *Tyvek wrap.
  9. *Install roof.
  10. *Install siding.  This includes all flashing.
  11. *Install attic vent and AAV (AAV = air access valve for the plumbing).
  12. Run the rough plumbing. (includes gas line for stove)
  13. Run the rough electric.
  14. *Install rodent barrier.
  15. *Install insulation.
  16. *Install flooring.
  17. *Install ceiling and attic insulation.
  18. *Install light fixtures.
  19. *Install paneling
  20. *Complete electrical and plumbing.
  21. *Install final flooring (carpet/linoleum).
  22. Install interior fixtures.  When I get here, I will likely create a new list for the interior work.

Monday, August 14, 2017

Driveway inspected, prepped for the rest of the week.

I managed to get most of the lot mowed before the driveway committee showed up.  They like to talk a lot, but they pretty much signed the paperwork before they even walked the driveway.  I got the impression they thought it was ridiculous that they had to come out for an existing driveway that meets regulations with the exception of a paved apron.

Once they left, it was already closing in on 7, so I just finished mowing, since it really needed it.  It was almost knee deep in a few spots, and shin deep almost everywhere.

The picture I forgot yesterday of the hurricane ties to the frame.  You can see where I had to clear off the foam which is why it took so long.


I now have all the hardware needed to bolt it to the frame.   Everything is grade 5, which basically means that the frame will implode around the bolts, but the bolts will hold.


I also found this in the garbage bin at work today.  It isn't the wider stuff that I wanted, but this is readily available for free from work.  Despite being thinner, I think it will be more than sufficient to hold the frame from lateral movement.  It is steel too, which is good since I won't have to worry about mixing metals, which can lead to premature corrosion/rust.


Once I was done mowing, I decided I still had enough time to pull the tarp down so tomorrow I could get to work immediately.  Unfortunately, when I left work the forecast was nice for the next few days, and when I got home, they changed tomorrow to storms.  Grrrr.  Too late now, I can't really put that tarp up by myself, and certainly not in a reasonable amount of time.  I hope it doesn't get too wet.


On an interesting side note, I got an email that my windows came in today.  They weren't supposed to be in for another week and a half, that is why I ordered them when I did.  Good thing I have a big shed.

Due to the meeting with the driveway committee, another day with no movement on the checklist.
  1. Square up the corners
  2. *Attach ceiling beams
  3. *Secure rafters and beams with hurricane ties
  4. Attach the subflooring to the trailer frame.
  5. *Sheathe the roof
  6. *Install tar paper to make the roof watertight.
  7. Install window framing.
  8. *Tyvek wrap.
  9. *Install roof.
  10. *Install siding.  This includes all flashing.
  11. *Install attic vent and AAV (AAV = air access valve for the plumbing).
  12. Run the rough plumbing. (includes gas line for stove)
  13. Run the rough electric.
  14. *Install rodent barrier.
  15. *Install insulation.
  16. *Install flooring.
  17. *Install ceiling and attic insulation.
  18. *Install light fixtures.
  19. *Install paneling
  20. *Complete electrical and plumbing.
  21. *Install final flooring (carpet/linoleum).
  22. Install interior fixtures.  When I get here, I will likely create a new list for the interior work.

Sunday, August 13, 2017

Roof sheathing cut, floor fastening begun.

Not a big update, but I did manage to get some stuff done today.  The pictures are kind of crappy since I forgot my camera.  Unfortunately I don't have a picture of it, but I got the hurricane ties for the subflooring to prevent it from lifting all set up, I just need bolts to put through the frame, which I hope to finish tomorrow.  This took much longer than expected, since I had to grind away the foam in most places, paint it, and wait for it dry.  I have been concerned about their lateral strength, and am considering putting some metal cabling in as well on the cross beams to help prevent side to side shifting.

I also got the plywood cut for the sheathing.  It is very difficult to get plywood in and out while it is tarped up, but I eventually figured it out.  I am not sure if this is all I will need (I knew 8 sheets would cover most of the roof, but I don't think it will cover all of it) but it is more than enough to get started.


I had an unfortunate casualty when cutting.  I went a little too far before moving the brace.  It was one of the boards I hadn't cut yet for the king studs.  It is still usable, just annoying.  The saw wasn't set deep enough to go all the way through it either.  On a positive note, the circular saw I got from Greg works much better than my old one, though it still has problems.  The blade gets stuck very easily for example.


There hasn't been any movement on the to-do list.
  1. Square up the corners
  2. *Attach ceiling beams
  3. *Secure rafters and beams with hurricane ties
  4. Attach the subflooring to the trailer frame.
  5. *Sheathe the roof
  6. *Install tar paper to make the roof watertight.
  7. Install window framing.
  8. *Tyvek wrap.
  9. *Install roof.
  10. *Install siding.  This includes all flashing.
  11. *Install attic vent and AAV (AAV = air access valve for the plumbing).
  12. Run the rough plumbing. (includes gas line for stove)
  13. Run the rough electric.
  14. *Install rodent barrier.
  15. *Install insulation.
  16. *Install flooring.
  17. *Install ceiling and attic insulation.
  18. *Install light fixtures.
  19. *Install paneling
  20. *Complete electrical and plumbing.
  21. *Install final flooring (carpet/linoleum).
  22. Install interior fixtures.  When I get here, I will likely create a new list for the interior work.
I also did some poking around online on wiring, and it turns out 12awg wire is substantially cheaper than 10awg wire, so I will likely only get 10awg for where it is needed, notably the heat pump and appliance ports.  I am still on the fence as to whether or not I want to put the extra 240V wiring in that I won't be using, but will allow future owners to install an electric stove and a full size dryer.  it won't be hard to do it now, but it is time and money for something I will never use.

Hopefully the driveway inspection will be quick tomorrow so I can get some more work done afterwards.  This would have been an ideal time to do the roofing since I have a stretch of four days with no rain, but I don't want to untarp it with the town coming up.  The less they see the better.

Saturday, August 12, 2017

Surprisingly nice day.

Today was actually pretty close to a perfect day for building.  Unfortunately since it was supposed to be crappy and stormy all day, I stayed up late last night and got a late start.  But it ended up being low 70s and sunny by early afternoon, so I got a bit done.

The first thing I did was install the ceiling supports.  They are only fastened on one side since I haven't squared everything up yet.


On a side note, if you want to mess with your eyes, work in a tarp enclosed area for an hour or two.  When I stepped back outside, everything was red from my brain overcompensating on the white balance.  Despite being a cool day, it was warm in there.

I also got all the frames build for the window.  The headers are all assembled, as well as the rough frames.


It still boggles my mind that this window is not big enough to be considered an egress window.


The property I looked at in Stoddard is pending sale, so that is off the table.  There is another one nearby that is roughly the same price, but is a lot smaller (only 1.1 acres).  If it comes to it, I might go visit it, but as I mentioned before, that is last resort.

On the paper work front, I got a call from the highway department, the driveway committee is scheduled to come out on Monday at 6.  I am leaving everything tarped since the planning board will likely be there as well, and the less they see the better.

I am glad they are coming on Monday, since I am rapidly running out of things to do without it being squared up.  I laid out all the "next steps" so that I always have something to work on.  Here is that list (items marked with a * have a dependency on another item and can't currently be worked on):

  1. Square up the corners
  2. *Attach ceiling beams
  3. *Secure rafters and beams with hurricane ties
  4. Attach the subflooring to the trailer frame.
  5. *Sheathe the roof
  6. *Install tar paper to make the roof watertight.
  7. Install window framing.
  8. *Tyvek wrap.
  9. *Install roof.
  10. *Install siding.  This includes all flashing.
  11. *Install attic vent and AAV (AAV = air access valve for the plumbing).
  12. Run the rough plumbing. (includes gas line for stove)
  13. Run the rough electric.
  14. *Install rodent barrier.
  15. *Install insulation.
  16. *Install flooring.
  17. *Install ceiling and attic insulation.
  18. *Install light fixtures.
  19. *Install paneling
  20. *Complete electrical and plumbing.
  21. *Install final flooring (carpet/linoleum).
  22. Install interior fixtures.  When I get here, I will likely create a new list for the interior work.
There are still a couple of things I can work on for the framing before I have to square everything up, but that list shrinks by the day.  I am a little concerned looking at it since it is already mid-August, and it doesn't include anything on the interior, no appliances, no counters, no bathroom, etc.  The good news is that since the space is so small, the interior shouldn't be too painful, and only a part of it is required to move in.  But I also still have to move.  Time is definitely running out.

Thursday, August 10, 2017

Boards cut, one mistake identified.

So I finally had a nice day and cut everything I had piling up.  It really was a lot of boards.  It took me an hour and a half to get everything cut.


I didn't cut the king studs.  I wasn't sure how many I am going to need.  They are all marked, so if I need them it is a quick chop.


All the boards are now divided into their respective window.


The mistake is that if you blow that picture up, you might notice is a board short.  In the end I ended up with an extra 35" board, and was short one 40" board.  Fortunately I have an old 2x4 in the shed that I can use to cut the last piece.  It is warped on one end, but there is enough usable board That I am not too concerned.


What I think happened is that since I was cutting the 40" pieces out of the worst boards (they have the most scrap) on several of them, I cut 5" off the end and then did the two 40s, so I could cut out as many of the defects as possible.  It looks like at one point I measured out and cut off 5", but didn't make the next mark at 45...

Despite not being a lot of wind, apparently the sawdust carried quite well today.  Dammit.  Now I have a film of sawdust all throughout my car, as if it wasn't dusty and dirty enough.


On a more interesting note, it appears that my car has fixed itself.  Late last week, I noticed that it was making a weird noise and shaking a little when I stepped into it.  So it was supposed to go in today to get looked at, and on my way into work today, there was a loud bang and something that looked like the heat shielding off my catalytic converter went rolling into the other lane.  The noise and shaking promptly went away.  I am a little surprised that the heat shielding was able to cause such a problem, but the mechanic looked at it anyways and said nothing appeared damaged, and there was nothing close enough to the catalytic converter to be worried about getting hotter.  I will just have to make sure I don't park my car in any fields.  It is hard to believe that the car is already almost 7 years old.